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WHY DID I LOST MY ORIGINAL IMAGE RESOLUTION WHEN USE THE PROGRAM. IS ANY CHANGE THAT I CAN KEEP THE ORIGINAL RESOLUTION?
Hi there,

Portrait Professional saves out exactly the same resolution as the input picture. What resolution was the input picture and what resolution was the output picture?

Tony


NANDO Wrote:WHY DID I LOST MY ORIGINAL IMAGE RESOLUTION WHEN USE THE PROGRAM. IS ANY CHANGE THAT I CAN KEEP THE ORIGINAL RESOLUTION?
I've been using the program since yesterday and all input pictures are about 180 to 300 resolution and the ouput are always 72.
I will be thankfull if i can get more information.
Hi Nando,

You are right, we don't currently preserve the dots per inch and we are looking into it. That fix should appear in a new version coming soon.

Also, let me reassure you that this does not affect the image quality in any way. As a workaround, you can easily change it in Photoshop or another editor, using the image size command, and making sure Resample Image check box is not ticked. I hope this helps you, and if not, please don't hesitate to post again.

Tony


NANDO Wrote:I've been using the program since yesterday and all input pictures are about 180 to 300 resolution and the ouput are always 72.
I will be thankfull if i can get more information.
Hmmm.... how can dots per inch be different if resolution is the same? I thought DPI WAS resolution. Or does the size change along with the res change? (And why does anything change?)

admin Wrote:Hi Nando,

You are right, we don't currently preserve the dots per inch and we are looking into it.  That fix should appear in a new version coming soon.  

Also, let me reassure you that this does not affect the image quality in any way.  As a workaround, you can easily change it in Photoshop or another editor, using the image size command, and making sure Resample Image check box is not ticked.  I hope this helps you, and if not, please don't hesitate to post again.

Tony


NANDO Wrote:I've been using the program since yesterday and all input pictures  are about 180 to 300 resolution  and the ouput  are always 72.
I will be thankfull if i can get more information.
Old versions of PP did lose the resolution (AKA DPI), which meant correspondingly that the image's physical size in inches would also change. I was just pointing out the the number of pixels in the picture was never touched, because sometimes people refer to a 'high resolution image' as one with a lot of pixels in it rather than one with a high DPI, and I didn't want people to think that we were loosing any precious picture information!

However, it's all fixed in the latest release of PortraitProfessional.

Tony

wingnut1

The one image I did so far kept the same resolution of 2692 x 3308 pixels. The file size decreased in the AFTER version from 5.36MB to 4.88MB, but that's to be expected as the original image file would have had more colour information with the various red tones and blotchiness (is that a proper word I wonder?). I'll try link to the image here so you get the idea;

[Image: Karen.jpg]

As you can see, the smoother skin tones and more uniform colour would be the reasons for the lower file size. The original shot was taken with a Nikon D2X and 70-200VR lens. I didn't make any colour adjustments, the lady is a blusher!

wingnut1

Tony is right about the DPI thing. The image dimensions don't get changed by PP, it just doesn't remember your viewing preferences and sets it to the web/monitor default of 72 pixels per inch.
Someone might find this freeware resizing tool handy in enlarging images. It does a damned sight better job than software costing an arm and a leg.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/imageenlarger/
(08-16-2011, 02:28 PM)francisfleming Wrote: [ -> ]Any one can say "how to recover the original resolution"?

Not sure it's important to recover the original resolution. Assuming you have a way to change the DPI (dots per inch), then you should be PRINTING images around 300 DPI (unless you are blowing them up a lot). And if displaying on screen, then 72 DPI is the usual choice.

Lots of cameras output at 180 (in high resolution). If I were going to print an image from this resolution, I'd be changing it anyway (to 300 DPI). 180 is somewhat of a useless DPI--not as good as it should be for print and over double what's needed for the screen.

Hope this helps.
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